Double-click here to edit the text.

Double-click here to edit the text.

futurelegal2006003.gif
Safeguarding my future
It is never too early to organise your affairs in order to protect your family and
business interests in the event of your incapacity or death. Unfortunately, many
people simply do not realise the implications of failing to prepare properly for the
future of their estate.All too often, the law is left to determine who will benefit from
the assets of the deceased and who will administer them.
Loved ones left behind could face unnecessary aggravation, painful delays and
extra expense. Without a Will, strict laws of inheritance may not accord with your
intentions for your money, possessions and property.With the correct advice though, your assets will be dealt with precisely as you wished.
Our consultantís will take the pain out of the estate administration process and will guide you with practical advice to arrange your affairs to
accordance with your wishes. Our aim is to provide a professional, efficient and sympathetic service to ensure all your specific requirements are met.
 
Wills and Probate
Two in three people in the UK have no will, according to the latest findings from Barclays Wealth. The findings show that 63% of us have yet to
write a will Ė exactly the number of Britons who claimed not to have a will in a similar study conducted a year ago. The findings also indicate
that Britons are failing to act on factors that mean more of us are likely to be liable to inheritance tax - such as rising house prices - and reviewing
their wills accordingly.The findings highlight a vast lack of awareness of the importance of wills as one of the easiest ways to protect wealth, and the
only way to be sure that an individualís wishes are fulfilled and avoid misunderstandings. There is a lot of work involved when taking someone's
estate through Probate as well as a huge amount of responsibility. If something goes wrong or you have not conducted yourself in a professional
manner you could be liable.
 
What is Probate?
When a person dies somebody has to deal with their estate (the money, property and possessions left) by collecting in all the money, paying
any debts and distributing the estate to those people entitled to it. The term probate often means the issuing of a legal document to one or more
people authorising them to do this. The probate registry issues the document, which is called a grant of representation.
There are three types of grant of representation:
1. Probate - Issued to one or more of the executors named in the deceased will.
 
2. Letters of administration (with will) - Issued when there is a will, but there is no executor named, or when the executors are unable to apply, or
do not wish to be involved in dealing with the estate
 
3. Letters of administration - Issued when the deceased had not made a will, or any will made is not valid
Previous Page   Next Page